Breeds

How Much Does a Bernedoodle Cost?

There’s something special about dog breeds that are part Poodle and part something else. Labradoodles and Shepadoodles, Goldendoodles, and Cockapoos are all adorable and highly sought-after breeds. 

The majestic giant teddy bear Bernedoodle is one of the most popular giant Poodle mix breeds. But how much does a Bernedoodle cost? (Hint: quite a bit)

how much does a bernedoodle cost
How much do Bernedoodles cost?

Since it was first introduced in 2003, the Bernedoodle has quickly become one of America’s most popular hybrid breeds. The white, brown, and black tri-color appearance of Bernese Mountain Dogs has always been loved by many people who don’t have space or resources to care for such big dogs. 

Mixing a Bernese Mountain Dog with a poodle adds a whole other layer of cuteness while bringing down the dog’s size and the difficulty of owning one. Combined with just how new the breed is, the rapid increase in demand for Bernedoodles has created a market where bringing one home from a breeder is quite expensive. 

In this guide, I’ll first answer the crucial question of ‘how much does a Bernedoodle cost?’ Then, we’ll go over what to look out for when choosing a breeder and the hidden costs of raising a Bernedoodle that you should consider.  

The Simple Answer: How Much Does a Bernedoodle Cost?

how much a bernedoodle puppy costs
What you can expect to pay for a Bernedoodle puppy

If you’re looking to buy a Bernedoodle directly from a breeder, you can expect to pay between $2500 and $5000. The median price will be somewhere around $4000, with dogs from less reputable breeders able to be found for prices between $800 and $1500. 

  • Expect to pay more for provoen hypoallergenic non-shedding Bernedoodle lines $3-5000
  • Expect to pay more for true Mini Bernedoodle lines too, often tarting at $3000 (Miniature Bernedoodle dogs are difficult to breed)
  • Australian Bernedoodles are a different breed but expect a minimum cost of $2500.

I can give you some examples of how much a Bernedoodle costs from specific breeders.

On the higher end, Swiss Ridge Kennels, based in Ontario, Canada, charge about $4900. In the American market, you can expect to pay $3950 from Rocky Mountain Bernedoodles in Montrose, California, and $4000 from Cottonwood Creek Doodles in Salt Lake City, Utah. Hurricane Creek Doodles and HC Bernedoodles, from Nashville, Tennessee, and Montrose, Colorado, respectively, sell their puppies for lower prices-between $3200 and $3500.

However, the prices I’ve quoted are just averages, and many different factors about the dog breed you want to get can affect them.

What Factors Affect the Price of a Bernedoodle? 

The reality is that many owners are more interested in dogs with specific characteristics and colors than those that don’t have those features. This means that certain puppies will end up being more expensive than others. In this section, we’ll look at how the price of a puppy changes based on several factors. 

bernedoodle costs
How much does a Bernedoodle cost? Are Mini Bernedoodles *really* that much more expensive?

Coat Color 

Although Bernese Mountain Dogs all have the same three colors in their distinctive pattern with a white stripe down the nose, Bernedoodle coloring is much more variable. There are four primary color profiles for Bernedoodles, each of which has a price range associated with it. 

Tri-Color Bernedoodle

The hybrid dogs that most closely resemble purebred Bernese Mountain dogs are the most in-demand and, therefore, also the most expensive. You can expect to pay about a $1000 premium for dogs with this color profile. 

This is clear white, rust, and jet black. Clearly defined areas with little to no blending.

Parti Bernedoodle

These dogs have only two colors, brown and white, and don’t have the same facial pattern as Bernese Mountain dogs. Instead, most of their fur is white, with large brown blotches on their body and brown fur around their eyes. Since they have such a distinctive look, these are the second most expensive Bernedoodle. 

Phantom Bernedoodle

A Phantom Bernedoodle also has two colors, with the main color being black, usually with inconsistent brown coloring. In many ways, they resemble the look of a Rottweiler or Doberman. These are often the least expensive. 

Merle Bernedoodles 

A Merle Bernedoodle has the most inconsistent coloring, but they pull it off. They have one solid base color, but many lighter grays and browns are speckled throughout. 

Location 

Like most things in life, the price of Bernedoodles varies according to what area you’re living in. If you look at breeders based in laces with high average salaries and a generally expensive cost of living, you can expect to pay much more for a puppy. 

If we look back to the examples of how much a specific Bernedoodle breeder are charging, it’s clear that the most expensive options are located in or around major economic centers, like Toronto and Salt Lake City. The price drops when you take a look at regional centers like Nashville. 

Size

The puppies that won’t grow very much, known as a mini Bernedoodle, are the most expensive. Prices can go even higher if we start talking about the even smaller teacup and micro mini Bernedoodle sizes (bred with a toy Poodle).

Medium and standard Bernedoodles are still expensive, but there’s not as much of a premium on them as the smallest of the breed. 

Type of Coat 

There are three different types of coat that a Bernedoodle can have: curly, wavy, and straight. Dogs with curly coats ate the most expensive, those with wavy coats the second most expensive, and those with straight coats the least expensive. 

Watch more dog videos on the Oodle Life YouTube channel.

Generation Effects Cost

A true F1 Bernedoodle is 50% Poodle and 50% Bernese Mountain Dog. These have the greatest chance of inheriting traits from either parent breed. The hypoallergenic coat is from the Poodle parent – so if the Bernedoodle ends up mimicking this trait expect non-shedding.

F1b Bernedoodle breed dogs are 75% Poodle and have the greatest chance of being non-shedding. If bred with a Standard Poodle these are still very large dogs.

A multigen or F2 Bernedoodle can have more predictable characteristics – just look to the parents.

A reputable breeder will clearly identifiy which generation your hybrid dog is. The quality breeder will have an idea of the apperance and coat type your dog will have (no guarantees). A cruddy puppy mill will not have as much info on each litter.

Putting it All Together 

All of these factors interact with one another as breeders are deciding how much to charge for their puppies. That means that puppies that combine the most desirable features will be the most expensive. 

If you’re looking for a tri color Bernedoodle that’s also teacup size with curly hair, you can expect to pay thousands more than the average $5000 price.  

Settling at a more definite price is impossible without knowing exactly what you imagine your future dog to look like and the specific breeders you’re interested in working with. 

Tips for Choosing A Good Bernedoodle Breeder

Not all breeders operate according to the same standards, which can affect your dog’s future health and temperament. 

For that reason, it’s essential to thoroughly research prospective breeders and make sure they operate according to the very highest of standards. 

Check Out Their Website

The first step is to see what the online presence of a breeder looks like. If a breeder’s website looks unprofessional and thrown together, those practices will likely carry over to how they breed and treat their dogs. 

Read the Reviews 

A google search for a breeder won’t only bring up their website but also reviews detailing what it’s like to work with that breeder and whether any problems arose during the process.

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Go For a Visit 

Unquestionably, the best way to tell whether a dog breeder is reputable is by visiting them and seeing how they operate. Issues like a lack of cleanliness, knowledge, or care can bring about adverse outcomes for a Bernedoodle pup in the long run. It’s also important to see how they are as people because it impacts how they treat their dogs. 

Adopting from a Bernedoodles Rescue?

You will be hard pressed to find a Bernedoodle puppy in an adoption centre or Bernedoodle rescue. They are too in demand and rare. 

The best bet is to follow the groups listed in our Cockapoo rescue guide. These Poodle mix rescues are where you would be most likely to find a rare Berendoodle rescue.

Pro tip: Join local and statewide Bernedoodle dog owner groups. Put your name out there as an option for a belived Bernedoodle that needs rehoming for a reason (typically it is size and when owners are forced to move to small quarters or a city). 

Summing Up

Buying a dog is a big decision and a big responsibility. When it comes to Bernedoodles, the newness of the breed, runaway popularity, and comparative lack of options mean that the breed is very expensive. 

Just how picky you are with what you want yourmmixed breed puppy to look like will significantly impact the price. Parti and Merle Bernedoodles are really sweet dogs, and you shouldn’t ignore them just because they don’t look precisely like a designer dog Bernese Mountain mix. 

When you’re looking at buying a Bernedoodle, you should be willing to pay a bit more and go with a reputable and professional breeder rather than looking for the cheapest possible option.